Productivity

Directory Aliases

If you’re constantly opening files from certain directories, create aliases for those directories to save time. To create a directory alias, from the main menu, click Tools > Options, expand Editing and select Global Aliases. Click New, enter a short text snippet that you can easily remember for the Alias Name, then click OK. Back on the Options dialog, select the new alias, then enter the complete directory path for the alias in the text box on the right.  Click OK on the Options dialog. Now you can use the alias in directory fields on various dialogs in SlickEdit (like File > Open): simply type the Alias Name and press Ctrl+Space to expand it.

Language-Specific Aliases

Language-specific aliases are similar to directory aliases except they can be used in edit windows for any frequently used text, like comment headers and language structures.

To create a language-specific alias, from the main menu, click Tools > Options > Languages, expand your language category and language, then select Aliases. On the Alias option page, click New and enter a short text snippet that you can easily remember for the alias name, then click OK. Back on the Options dialog, select the new alias, then enter the text substitution for the alias in the text box on the right. Click OK on the Options dialog.
Now when you have a buffer or file open in that language, you can use the alias by typing the identifier and pressing Ctrl+SpaceLanguage-specific aliases are similar to [url=”http://community.slickedit.com/index.php?topic=3399.0″]directory aliases[/url] except they can be used in edit windows for any frequently used text, like comment headers and language structures.
To create a language-specific alias, from the main menu, click Tools > Options > Languages, expand your language category and language, then select Aliases. On the Alias option page, click New and enter a short text snippet that you can easily remember for the alias name, then click OK. Back on the Options dialog, select the new alias, then enter the text substitution for the alias in the text box on the right. Click OK on the Options dialog.
Now when you have a buffer or file open in that language, you can use the alias by typing the identifier and pressing Ctrl+Space.

To create a language-specific alias, from the main menu, click Tools > Options > Languages, expand your language category and language, then select Aliases. On the Alias option page, click New and enter a short text snippet that you can easily remember for the alias name, then click OK. Back on the Options dialog, select the new alias, then enter the text substitution for the alias in the text box on the right. Click OK on the Options dialog.

Now when you have a buffer or file open in that language, you can use the alias by typing the identifier and pressing Ctrl+Space.

Alias from Selection

A quick way to create a language-specific alias is to create it from a selection. Select some text in the editor, then right-click and select Create Alias from the context menu. Enter a name for the alias and click OK. The Options dialog appears, open to the Language-Specific Alias Options for the current language, and showing the new alias. Click OK on the Options dialog.

Greg Christopher of VMware has written an article for DevX.com: Hey, Check Out My Slick New Editor!

In the article he discussing some of his favorite features of SlickEdit and why SlickEdit is his code editor of choice for programming.

On objections on switching editors

If your current editor works well enough for you, why switch? The answer depends on how you define “well enough.” Your current editor probably handles every editing command you think you need now, but consider the possibility that something could make you far more productive. You’ll see a few examples in a moment, but first, here are some of the reasons you might decide not to switch editors.

(more…)

I have always liked the idea of the Services menu, but found it frustratingly crowded and not often helpful. And I always thought Automator had real potential, but I never really found a place for it in my day-to-day work. With the improvements to the Services menu in Snow Leopard, the combination of these features is wonderfully useful.

SlickEdit’s Slick-C macro language should be no stranger to our users, but many folks aren’t aware that macros can be called when SlickEdit is started. In this tutorial, I’ll demonstrate how to use Automator to create a simple text service for SlickEdit, using this macro call facility. (more…)

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